Two Ways to Get Mobile Friendly

The mobile market is one of the fastest growing groups of users in recent history, with some estimates putting them at nearly half of all internet traffic worldwide. Considering that the number of people online, as a whole, is somewhere around half of the global population, that’s a considerable amount of users that are using a standard that differs greatly from what you get on a desktop experience.

Here are two ways that you can improve your site, to reach those users:

Two Ways to Get Mobile Friendly
  • Just ditch Flash. We know, if you’re already using Flash, it’s hard to kick the habit. Flash is quickly on its way out, with the recent conversions that popular websites have been making to the far more stable and secure standard of HTML5 for media rich and interactive content. Even Mozilla had to intervene in a recent security exploit situation and disable Flash by default in its Firefox browser.
Two Ways to Get Mobile Friendly

Flash is considered to be vexing for a wide host of reasons, not the least of which is the aforementioned security concerns. Another reason is that it just isn’t supported on some of the most popular mobile browsing platforms and software, and that makes things tricky when you want to engage what is quickly becoming the dominant demographic of browsers online. HTML5, on the other hand, is more widely accepted, including by those browsers using iOS mobile devices. If you want to reach out to more users, ditch Flash.

Two Ways to Get Mobile Friendly
  • Build a responsive site. In 2015, you really need to be considering how you’re reaching your audience. If you haven’t already taken stock, it’s almost a sure bet that anywhere from 40% to 80% of your traffic is going to come from mobile devices. 48% of traffic, on average, comes from mobile devices like smart phones and tablets, and each of those devices have differing viewport sizes. Those viewport sizes mean differences in how fonts look, how images stretch, and how readable a page is overall.

It’s safe to assume that any mobile user, with a screen at any size, is going to think twice about staying on your site to find out what you have to offer if it doesn’t have a mobile friendly version for them to use. Not only is it more difficult to navigate a site that isn’t mobile-optimized, but these sites often load more slowly and have more errors for mobile browsers. Go responsive, and you’ll be able to reach far more people than you otherwise would.

These are just suggestions, of course, and they don’t cover the entire array of what you may need. Your choice of typography, your caching system, and your CSS management will all factor into how mobile-friendly a site is or is not. The important thing is to get started on the process by following trends like responsive design, and all that it entails, and by seeing what the big companies are doing with their media rich presentations.